25 Bunny Books perfect for Spring

Bunny books are my kryptonite. I’ve had an ever growing collection of bunny books since I was a little girl, thanks to my mom who has faithfully given them as gifts over the years. One of the best parts of having a children’s book collection of any sort is sharing them with your own children. It’s been a joy to see my two little ones delight in these stories as much as I did/do.

Several of these recommendations are no longer in print but are worth searching out at the library or getting a used copy from an online seller like Thrift Books or Discover Books (I try to avoid previous library books when ordering from these sites so we don’t get the plasticy cover).

Whether you’re looking for a book to slip in to an Easter basket or you have a bunny loving kiddo, these 25 bunny books are some of my favorite! I’m always looking for more bunny books, though, so please share any I missed in the comments!

 Too Many Hopkins by Tomie de Paola

I’m sad this isn’t in print any more (an absolute classic in our household), but it’s available used. Tomie de Paola is an iconic children’s book author and illustrator. Too Many Hopkins subtly teaches the basics of gardening, how to work together and all the Hopkins have fun alliterative names.

I am a Bunny by Ole Risom, illustrated by Richard Scarry

This classic IS still in print! Little Nicholas in his cute red overalls talks about the things he does each season. The unique size of this board book is fun but it also comes in regular Golden Book size. Pat The Bunny by Dorothy Kunhardt

Every child’s library should include this book. I can smell the flowers even now…

Bunnies Are For Kissing by Allia Zobel Nola, Illustrated by Jacqueline East

“Bunnies are for kissing. They’re meant for hugging too. Sure as we have floppy ears, sweet Bunny, we love you!” Quoted from memory because this book is a favorite of my kids and has a catchy rhyme scheme.

Bunny Trouble & More Bunny Trouble by Hans Wilhelm 

Naturally, I liked the characters in the Bunny Trouble stories because the little sister is named Emily. Even if you don’t share a name with one of the characters, these are fun and especially good for Easter because this troupe of bunnies paint Easter eggs for a living.

Fuzzy Rabbit by Rosemary Billam, Illustrated by Vanessa Julian-Ottie

Even though the Fuzzy Rabbit books aren’t in print, I can’t leave them off the list. Used copies abound.  Fuzzy has adventures in the park and with his owner’s little brother. The illustrations are charmingly old-fashioned.

This Little Bunny Can Bake by Janet Stein

If you’re child enjoys cooking, this little bunny will be a welcome addition to your collection. Bunny and several other students go to Chef George’s School of Dessertology and learn the basics of baking. There isn’t much of a storyline but the illustrations are packed with silliness (Dog making a shoe-fly pie…) that is fun to talk about with kiddos.

The Wonderful Habits of Rabbits by Douglas Florian, Illustrated by Sonia Sánchez

What do rabbits do all day? This family of rabbits will show you all the fun things they do – smelling flowers in Spring, lazing for hours in Summer, and digging holes, to name a few. The text is poetic and the illustrations are unique and charming.The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams, Illustrated by Sarah Massini

There are plenty of versions of this classic, but I’m quite partial to the illustrations by Sarah Massini in this beautiful edition.

Bunny’s First Spring by Sally Lloyd-Jones, Illustrated by David McPhail

Sally Lloyd-Jones, author of The Jesus Storybook Bible, is a treasure. She writes books that have depth of sentiment but still connect with little readers. In Bunny’s First Spring, Bunny experiences the changing seasons for the first time and fears “the beautiful earth must be dying.” Lloyd-Jones perfectly captures the wonder and beauty to be found in the signs of passing time.

Too Many Carrots by Katy Hudson

Barnes and Noble pushed this book last Spring for good reason. Hudson’s illustrations are vibrant and engaging. She also doesn’t skimp on the end sheets and front matter, all of which are boldly illustrated with fun extras. Ultimately about sharing, Too Many Carrots follows rabbit as he tries to find a home suitable for himself and his carrots.

 It’s Not Easy Being A Bunny by Marilyn Sadler, Illustrated by Roger Bollen

Poor PJ Funnybunny does not like being a bunny. He tries living with all sorts of other animals only to figure out being a bunny isn’t so bad after all.  I can’t count the number of times I’ve read this since I was a kid. Great repeating text and an opportunity to demonstrate your moose calling abilities.Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney, Illustrated by Anita Jeram

Anita Jeram is one of my favorite illustrators (think Bunny My Honey, You’re All My Favorites, and Skip To The Loo, My Darling – an amazing potty training book)

 Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems

Another set (this is the first) of books that has a dad-child relationship on display. This one would be dad-daughter-bunny… Willems uses colored drawings over black and white photographs to illustrate these Knuffle Bunny adventures. They are hilarious.

La La Rose by Satomi Ichikawa

Ichikawa’s love of Paris is evident in her gorgeous illustrations of Luxembourg Gardens where poor La La Rose gets separated from her friend Clementine. La La Rose narrates her journey around the Gardens until she is finally reunited with Clementine. I am so sad this award winning book isn’t Prime-able. It’s worth searching out. If you can’t find it, cry your way through You Are My I Love You and get a sense for Ichikawa’s gift for illustrating.

 The Night Before Easter by Natasha Wing, Illustrated by Kathy Couri

For our family, Easter is about celebrating that Jesus died and rose again to give us eternal life with Him. That being said, we aren’t above bunnies and eggs and baskets of goodies. This is a clever riff on The Night Before Christmas.

A Night-Light for Bunny by Geoffery Hayes

Bunny and Papa search for the perfect night light. Bun has a bit of an attitude, but I like that this includes the dad and talks about sources of light. The end has a song that my children enjoy hearing me sing (tunelessly) differently every time we read it.

The Country Bunny And The Little Gold Shoes by Du Bose Heyward, Illustrated by Marjorie Hack 

A strong female protagonist (the country bunny, mom to 21 baby buns) makes this a timely tale despite it’s publication date almost 80 years ago. The Country Bunny proves herself wise, kind, clever, and swift enough to be one of the five Easter Bunnies who deliver eggs all over the world.

 The April Rabbits by David Cleveland, Illustrated by Nurit Karlin

Another book that I must have acquired in elementary school and have vivid reading memories of the illustrations. Robert sees an increasing number of rabbits for every day in April. Lots of humor in the illustrations.

 I’m Big Enough by Amber Stewart, Ilustrated by Layn Marlow

Confession: I still sleep with my childhood blanket. And it has a name. (Insert monkey covering eyes emoji here.) I have a very tolerant husband. Bean can’t find her blanket and learns to cope without it until she realizes she really is big enough to not have one. Apparently Bean is more mature than me.

 Bunny’s Book Club by Annie Silvestro , Illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss

If there were book trump cards, this would be mine. Bunny and books. Need I say more?

 Audrey Bunny by Angie Smith, Illustrated by Breezy Brookshire

Another one I can’t make it through without crying. If you know anything about Angie Smith’s story (she’s a Christian author/blogger who lost a daughter, Audrey, in utero), it will make the name of this Bun even more poignant.

 The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown, Illustrated by Clement Hurd

A classic by the author of Goodnight Moon and Little Fur Family (just realized that connection and my mind is a little blown).

Bunnies for Tea by Kate Stone

The book is shaped like a tea cup. Sweet illustrations and rhyming text.

Bunny Slopes by Claudia Rueda

It’s always good for me to have books around that help me (and the kids) celebrate Winter. This one gets readers to interact and help Bunny get skiing.

2 thoughts on “25 Bunny Books perfect for Spring

  1. This is such a great collection! I’m with Katharine and have never liked Guess How Much I Love You (I think because comparison type things with love bother me). You reminded me to look for one I loved as a kid- Bunny Trouble by Hans Wilhelm. I’ll have to see if my parents still have it!

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